Saudi-led Coalition to Begin Allowing Aid Into Yemen

Arab world’s richest nation Saudi Arabia commits genocide on the Arab world’s poorest country Yemen

Arab world’s richest nation Saudi Arabia commits genocide on the Arab world’s poorest country Yemen

The coalition said on Wednesday that it would reopen the war-torn country's main airport and a key Red Sea port to humanitarian traffic on Thursday.

"We're of course encouraged by the clearance of this flight which may be followed soon by clearances of flights from Djibouti to Sanaa", Laerke told a news briefing on Friday.

The Saudi-led military coalition fighting Shiite rebels in Yemen has announced it will reopen the war-torn country's main worldwide airport in the capital of Sanaa and a vital Red Sea port to give access to humanitarian aid.

The spokesman has emphasized the blockade could contribute to the degradation of the health situation in Yemen.

The coalition closed air, land and sea access on November 6 to stop the flow of arms to the Houthis from Iran.

Jan Egeland, a former United Nations aid chief who heads the Norwegian Refugee Council, speaking to Reuters in Geneva on Thursday, said of the blockade: "In my view this is illegal collective punishment". The action came after Saudi Arabia intercepted a missile fired toward Riyadh. Iran has denied supplying the Houthis with weapons.

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Houthi authorities who control the capital Sanaa were also imposing restrictions on access for aid workers, he said.

Nearly 9,000 people have since been killed, but millions face the risk of a deadly cholera epidemic and stand on the brink of starvation.

The United Nations says some 7 million Yemenis are on the brink of starvation and 945,000 have been infected since April with cholera.

His comments came shortly before the Saudi-led military coalition fighting Shiite rebels in Yemen announced it would reopen Sanaa airport and the port of Hodeida on Thursday for urgent humanitarian aid and United Nations aircraft.

The UN humanitarian agency OCHA also said on Friday saying that supplies of petrol and diesel are expected to run out in the coming week and the largest fuel importing companies will no longer be able to supply the consumer market.

"Yemenis will need more than aid in order to survive the crisis and ward off starvation", spokeswoman Iolanda Jaquemet said.

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