OH race too close to call but Trump claims victory

On Tuesday in the last special election before the midterms Democrats might just snag another deep red Congressional seat

On Tuesday in the last special election before the midterms Democrats might just snag another deep red Congressional seat

President Donald Trump called the OH special election for Republican Troy Balderson over his Democratic competitor Danny O'Connor despite an official call by news outlets.

Donald Trump has claimed victory for the Republican candidate in a hotly-contested OH election, saying his visit to the state helped him come from behind to defeat a tough challenge from his Democrat rival. The race is a test of voter sentiment before the general election in November, when Balderson and O'Connor will battle again for the full two-year term.

Tonight, the OH special election widely seen as a referendum on President Donald Trump reaches its conclusion.

In battleground OH, the president took credit for Republican Troy Balderson's performance, calling it "a great victory", even though the contest could be headed to a recount. Trump carried this district by over 11 points in 2016.

CNN chief national correspondent and anchor John King on Tuesday noted that a Democratic win in Tuesday's special election in a heavily-red district in OH could signal a blue wave in the fall that would likely put impeachment "on the table".

The most recent poll, released by Emerson College on Monday, called the race a dead heat.

Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley is expected to take on McCaskill, and in MI, military veteran and business executive John James is vying for the chance to knock off Stabenow.

"We always knew this was going to be a close race, and while we don't know the results quite yet, I know that this campaign left it all on the field", O'Connor said in a statement Tuesday night.

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In Michigan, State Attorney General Bill Schuette won the Republican nomination for governor on Tuesday night, defeating three other candidates working to fill the seat to be vacated by conservative Gov. Rick Snyder.

But the fact that this race was even competitive to begin with casts doubt on Republican prospects of staving off that outcome.

If Balderson's 1,766 vote margin holds up, Democrats still need a net gain of 23 seats to take back the majority, and Republicans still need to hold on to 61 seats to maintain the majority.

Senate Republicans had hoped to make MI, a state which Trump carried, competitive, but it's fallen down the list of top targets for 2018. All 435 House seats, 35 of 100 Senate seats and 36 of 50 governors' offices are up for grabs in November.

Republicans were hoping for Democratic discord in Kansas' 3rd Congressional District, a suburban Kansas City district where several candidates were fighting for the chance to take on Republican Rep. Kevin Yoder in November.

The five-way Democratic primary featured labour lawyer Brent Welder, who campaigned recently with self-described democratic socialists Vermont Sen.

Ohio's Republican Gov. John Kasich said the race shouldn't even be close, but it is. O'Connor had raised almost $1.5 million and had spent $1.35 million, but had vastly outspent Balderson when it came to television advertising. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-Bronx/Queens) saw their chosen Michigan Democratic gubernatorial-primary candidate, Abdul El-Sayed, lose. Other top candidates include Sharice Davids, an EMILY's List-endorsed former MMA fighter attempting to become the first Native American lesbian in Congress, and Tom Niermann, a teacher running a more moderate campaign with a long list of local officials' endorsements. Two vulnerable Senate Democrats, Missouri's Claire McCaskill, and Michigan's Debbie Stabenow are facing challenges in their states.

In Missouri, Democratic Sen.

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